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K-2 Math Projects

 Stampendous K-2 Math Projects

By: Cathy Scolnick

For Openers....before you introduce your students to the stamp center, put all your stamps into a large jar or other see-through container. Play a game of estimating how many different stamps are in the container. When it is time to count the stamps, count each one as it is laid on its spot on the cookie sheet (see Rubber Stamps - An Overview). This will familiarize the students with the images, give them "class ownership" of the stamps, and provide a nice hands-on activity to learn about estimating.

Once the stamps have been laid out, discuss ways in which the stamps could be sorted; wood handles vs. soft-back, images of animals vs. images of people, etc. Sometimes an assortment of stamps can be sorted more than one way; in the air, on the land, in the water, or paws, claws, fins, scales.

The great thing about having an assortment of stamps is that you can adapt your own worksheets to the materials you have on hand. For example, in "Just Enough Carrots" by Stuart J. Murphy, the items counted are cans of worms, bunches of carrots, and bags of peanuts. You can easily substitute a worm, a carrot, and a peanut, or an orange, an apple, and a nice green leaf. Because you will be creating your own worksheet you can adapt it to the needs of your students, providing remedial interpretation (comparing quantities of the same thing) on up to higher level skills (two bunches of six equals how many total?).


"The M & M's Brand Chocolate Candies Counting Book"
by Barbara Barbieri McGrath

Concepts: Number relationships, color relationships, sequencing, patterning.
Materials: Worksheet, stamps to coordinate with unit (hopefully a candy image, but can be one of anything), wet cleaning cloth, stamp pads or markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. Review the concept of sets.
2.Using only one color stamp pad, have the students stamp out the required numbers, shapes, and sets.
3.Using pads or markers in the colors of blue, green, brown, orange, yellow, and red, have the students stamp out the appropriate sets to match the text.
Thinking Skills:
1.By varying your worksheets this book can be used for several primary concepts. You can begin by basic grouping, stamping six in a straight line, then six in a circle. Is the sum the same?
2.Open a bag of candy and have the students stamp out the same number total and color matches to the bag contents.
3.Using a separate worksheet, have the students stamp out the number of times that equals the numerals 1, 2, 3, etc., along with the words one, two, three, etc.
4.Extension activities can include working with "More M & M's Brand Chocolate Candies Math" by Barbara Barbieri McGrath.
 
 

"Over in the Meadow"
Available by various authors

Concepts: Number relationships, sequencing, simple addition.
Materials: Worksheet, stamps to coordinate with your version of the rhyme, wet cleaning cloth, stamp pads or markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. Review the relationship between the numerals and the words (1-one, 2-two, etc.).
2.Have the students stamp out their worksheets. (One frog, two birds, three mice, etc..)
Thinking Skills:
1.This rhyme is a perfect stamp activity. Because the poem is open-ended, students can stamp our their own assortment of critters.
2.You can turn this into a flap book activity with the students making up their own version.
3.Adapt the poem to "Over in the Barnyard" or "Over in the Desert" to work with other thematic units.


"Just Enough Carrots"
By Stuart J. Murphy

Concepts: Fewer, some, and more.
Materials: Worksheet, stamps to coordinate with this story or three other images to differentiate sums, wet cleaning cloth, stamp pads or markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. Review the concept of fewer, same, and more.
2.Have the students stamp out on their worksheets relationships identical to those in the book.
3.Have the students stamp out relationships that have been varied from the book.
Thinking Skills:
What if we started with zero items?
In what kinds of situations might we need to know the concepts of more, fewer, and same? (i.e., We need more spoons at the table. We need less rain. We have the same lunch period as the 5th graders.)
 
 

"Counting is for the Birds"
By Frank Mazzola, Jr.

Concepts: Number relationships, sequencing, simple addition, matching text to color and graphic.
Materials: Worksheet, stamps of birds, wet cleaning cloth, stamp pads or markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. Note the cat hiding in the bushes. Will he eat the birds? What will happen at the end of the story? How many students guessed the right answer?
2.Have the students stamp out their worksheet birds two at a time. Using different color pads or magic markets, have them work in pairs of colors (two red birds, two blue birds, two yellow, etc.) until they have ten pairs of birds stamped.
3.Provide a second worksheet that indicates how to add pairs of twos.
Thinking Skills:
1.This book is chock full of information about common birds. Make a bird feeder by covering either a slice of bread or pine cone with peanut butter, rolling it in birdseed, and looping it with twine. Hang it from a nearby window and count the number of birds who stop to feed. How many different kinds of birds? How many days does it take for the birds to eat all the seed? Do any other animals eat off the feeder (squirrels, raccoons)?
2.Look at the birdseed. How many different kids of seeds are there? Do people eat any of the same seeds as birds?
3.What kinds of activities might scare the birds from the feeder? Create a chart and note what happens at your feeder.

 
 

"The Best Bug Parade"
By Stuart J. Murphy

Concepts: Comparison and estimation.
Materials: Worksheet, stamps of varying image sizes, wet cleaning cloth, stamp pads or markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. Review the concept of comparing.
2.Have the students stamp out the relationships as required by the worksheets.
Thinking Skills:
1.Discuss the relativity of comparisons. The biggest bug in one group may be the smallest in another. The longest may be the biggest, but not necessarily. Have fun with these sorts of analysis.
2.Give the students sheets of paper with a "bug jar" drawn on it. Using different size or stamps, have the students estimate how many bugs they can fit in the jar. Are there patterns that help allow more bugs than others?

 
 

"The Mitten"
Several versions including the popular Jan Brett

Concepts: Sequencing, simple addition, predicting.
Materials: Worksheet or printed sheets to make into a "flap book", stamps to match your story, stamp pads and markers.
Activity:
1.Read the book aloud with the class. On the second read-through add up the number of animals that hide in the mitten.
2.Have the students stamp out the worksheet. You may replicate the animals in the version of the story that you have, or you can create a worksheet that reflects the animals chosen by your students.
3.To make this story work as a math unit, have the story line reflect the number of animals climbing into the mitten. (Sample text follows.)
Thinking Skills:
Add, then subtract, the number of animals in the mitten. How would this number change if we lost two mittens? Could we fit more mice than moose in a mitten?
Once we know the order in which the animals enter the mitten, can we predict the order in which they will leave the mitten?

 
 

"Mitten Math"
By: Cathy Scolnick

This project can be completed in several ways. For the youngest students, simply have them stamp the animals that climb inside the mitten on mitten-shaped precut sheets of paper. Have them stamp the cover and color it in, then stamp the animals that they chose to climb inside their mitten. For emergent literate children, have them stamp the image of the animals mentioned in ready-made sentence strips. As children become more advanced they can begin to write their own version. You can also include some basic math skills by using sentences like, "One baby rabbit climbed inside. Next, one baby squirrel climbed inside. One rabbit + one squirrel = two animals," etc. Or, you could have the math shown numerically on the top of the page with the text below it.

Here is a sample text. Have fun with this easy addition and subtraction booklet.

Page 1 One cold day I lost my mitten.
A baby_____climbed inside.
            rabbit

"Who will join me?" asked the_____?
                                                    rabbit

Page 2
"I will," said the_____.
                             fox

Page 3
"I will," said the_____.
                              mole

Page 4
"I will," said the_____.
                             hedgehog

Page 5
"I will," said the_____.
                              owl

Page 6
"I will," said the______.
                              badger

Page 7
"I will," said the_____.
                              bear

Page 8
"I will," said the_____.
                              mouse

Page 9
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     bear

He ran away.

Page 10
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     badger

He ran away.

Page 11
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     owl

He flew away.

Page 12
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     hedgehog

He ran away.

Page 13
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     mole

He ran away.

Page 14
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     fox

He ran away.

Page 15
"A mouse!" cried the_____.
                                     rabbit

He ran away.

Page 16
I found my mitten in the snow.
But now it's a house for a tiny_______.
                                                    mouse


  Working with "The M & M's Brand Chocolate Counting Book"


 
________________________________________________________
12 candies in 1 Set

________________________________________________________
2 sets of 6

________________________________________________________
3 sets of 4

________________________________________________________
4 sets of 3

________________________________________________________
6 sets of 2

 

Working with "Counting is for Birds"


 
1 Cardinal_________ + 1 Cardinal__________= 2_________________

1 Sparrow_________ + 1 Sparrow__________= 2_________________

2 Cardinals____________+ 2 Sparrows_____________= 4 birds

4 Birds_________________________+ 2 Jays_________________________
=6 birds________________________________________________________
 

 

Working with "Just Enough Carrots" by Stuart J. Murphy
 

 
We have 4 carrots:

 

 

 


Bird has the same amount:

 

 

 


We have 2 peanuts:

 

 


Bird has the same amount:

 

 


We have 3 worms:

 

 


Frog has the same amount:
 
 
Horse has more carrots:

 

 

 


Elephant has more carrots:

 

 

 


Squirrel has fewer peanuts

 

 


Elephant has more peanuts:

 

 


Elephant has fewer worms:

 

 


Bird has more worms:
 

 

 
 


Working with "Over in the Meadow"
Adapt to text to fit the SS123 Nature Fun set.


 
1 turtle___________ 2 frogs____________
                   one                                  two
 
 
3 squirrels______________________ 4 mice_________________________                                  three                                                               four
 
 
5 ants______________________ 6 birds_________________________                                  five                                                               six
 
 
7 ducks_______________________________________________________                                                                 seven
 
 
8 bunnies_______________________________________________________                                                                 eight
 
 
9 fishes_______________________________________________________                                                                 nine
 
 
10 foxes_______________________________________________________                                                                 ten
 
 

 

 
 


"The Best Bug Parade"
By: Stuart J. Murphy
 
__________
 ________________
 _____________________
 
Big
 Bigger
 Biggest
 

_____________________
 ________________
 __________
 
Small
 Smaller
 Smallest
 


__________
 ________________
 _____________________
 
Long
 Longer
 Longest
 


_____________________
 ________________
 __________
 
Short
 Shorter
 Shortest
 

 

 
 
_______________________
3 is GOOD
 
 
______________________________________________
6 is BETTER
 
 
_____________________________________________________________________
9 is BEST